ART: ISSUE #15

Featured Artist

Collage

 

Abigail Child

 

 

 

"The Magician" by Abigail Child with Henry Hills, 14" x 14" Canson Infinity BFK Rives, 1986, Mud Season Review

“The Magician” by Abigail Child with Henry Hills, 14″ x 14″ Canson Infinity BFK Rives, 1986

 

 

 

"Sugar" by Abigail Child, 36" x 28.5" Canson Infinity, May 2012, Mud Season Review

“Sugar” by Abigail Child, 36″ x 28.5″ Canson Infinity, May 2012

 

 

 

"Bosch" by Abigail Child with Henry Hills, 36" x 17.25" Canson Infinity BFK Rives, May 2012, Mud Season Review

“Bosch” by Abigail Child with Henry Hills, 36″ x 17.25″ Canson Infinity BFK Rives, May 2012

 

 

 

"Color Wheel" by Abigail Child, Mud Season Review

“Color Wheel” by Abigail Child

 

 

 

"Vertebrae" by Abigail Child, 28" x 36" Canson Infinity BFK Rives, May 2012, Mud Season Review

“Vertebrae” by Abigail Child, 28″ x 36″ Canson Infinity BFK Rives, May 2012

 

 

 

"New Modern Times" by Abigail Child, 1987, Mud Season Review

“New Modern Times” by Abigail Child, 1987

 

 

 

"Plume" by Abigail Child, 18" x 37" Canson Infinity BFK Rives, May 2012, Mud Season Review

“Plume” by Abigail Child, 18″ x 37″ Canson Infinity BFK Rives, May 2012

 

 

 

Artist Statement

The work consistently places disruption in conjunction with consumerist and pop culture, simultaneously eliciting the surrealist Americanism of a Bruce Conner, the cut-and-paste gestures of Hannah Hoch and the sensuousness of Sargent, alive to the makeup of the social body.

The desire: to explode narrative and preconceived notions. I use strategies of asymptotic convergence, vertical montage, a-harmonic weave, digital archive, language mis-translation, sonata look-a-likes, sound and noise juxtapositions— jolly and foreboding. We live in a world cluttered with things, so it is important to go below and behind them, to re-contextualize the given and refresh it, to enlarge possibilities, and upset the powers that restrain us—whether exterior or interior.

The goal for the (near) future: to make a cinema-in-the-round where images surround us— fragmented, prismatic, fleeting—impossible to unify, potent, beautiful.

“We perceive that a set of concerns builds up, with artful indirectness: women’s power; the gestures of gender, manipulation of a spectator’s sensibility through the medium of film, large-scale political implications of small moments. “ Karen Schiff. Big Red & Shiny, Issue 42.

Abigail Child

Abigail Child has been at the forefront of experimental writing and media since the 1980s, having completed more than thirty film/video works and installations, and written six books. She is a winner of the Rome Prize, a Radcliffe Institute Fellowship, Guggenheim and Fulbright Fellowships, the Stan Brakhage Award, as well as participating in two Whitney Biennials (1989 and 1997). Her work has been exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art NY, the Whitney Museum, Centre Pompidou, Museo Reina Sofia, and in numerous international film festivals, including New York, Rotterdam, Locarno and London. Harvard University Cinematheque has created an Abigail Child Collection dedicated to preserving and exhibiting her work. Child is also the author of five books of poetry and a book of critical writings. Her most recent work is an ongoing trilogy of features on Women and Ideology. As a teacher at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Child has been instrumental in building an interdisciplinary media/film program; her work and practice have inspired a generation of younger artists.

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