ART ISSUE #37

Cricket
Image: “Cricket,” paper, 14x8x6 in, 2013

Kristian Brevik

Sculpture

 

 

Kristian Brevik explores the ways in which humans and other species interact and primarily works with wood, cloth, paper, and other materials provided by plants and animals. Kristian began making sculpture using a wide array of materials and techniques while growing up in Port Townsend, Washington, where he worked with Maureen Piper, Lorna Smith, and other teachers. He studied sculpture and evolutionary biology/ecology at Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusetts, where he began to combine artistic and scientific ways of knowing. Kristian currently researches insect evolution and genetics at the University of Vermont, studying the impacts of human activity on insects. He continues to walk the border between art and science.

Kristian’s current work merges the forms of ships and whales, landscapes and our use of them, and functional objects with unusual components sourced from animals (e.g. breadknife/sharkteeth). This merging draws from the ways species shape each other; through domestication, eating each other, and changing each others’ experience of the world. His sculpture encourages one to wonder where art and function sit together and how art can be framed as a conversation between artist and material, where seemingly competing forces create one another – ‘to light a candle is to cast a shadow’.

His work has been found in lantern festivals, environmental activism campaigns, and at gallery shows around the country, from the Art/Science Gallery in Austin, Texas, to Castle in the Clouds in New Hampshire, to The Fairbanks Museum and Studio Place Arts in Vermont, among others. His work can be found at Frog Hollow in Burlington, Vermont.

Kristian Brevik

Kristian Brevik studied sculpture and evolutionary biology/ecology at Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusetts, where he began to combine artistic and scientific ways of knowing. Kristian currently researches insect evolution and genetics at the University of Vermont, studying the impacts of human activity on insects. He continues to walk the border between art and science.

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